“Children of Blood and Bone” – A Review

Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orïsha, #1)Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This was an EXCELLENT piece of writing, and I am so proud of Ms. Adeyemi for her fearlessness in presenting the voice of the instantly classic female heroines, Zélie and Amari. It often boggles my mind that, as open, far-reaching, and stereotype-pushing as Fantasy and Science Fiction wants to be, this beloved genre often falls prey to the same institutional biases that it rails against. I’m speaking specifically to the issues of race and culture. There are not enough SF/F novels based on or inspired by the civilizations outside of Western (Anglo/Euro) culture or influence.

Warriors still have codes that mimic the tenets of European “chivalry” during the Middle Ages, wizards are still old, mottled, grey-haired white or pale-skinned males, and a protagonist can come in every color but brown, red, or black. And there will never be enough female representation, even though on that front we are FINALLY making gains.

No longer. This book is a war cry that sets itself apart from the typical SF/F read while also holding true to the best parts of the genre that we love: magic, intrigue, star-crossed love, war, epic battles, and the power of one’s destiny.

You are IMMEDIATELY pulled into the world of Orïsha, and despite its MANY faults, by the end of the novel, you want to burn your passport and claim your citizenship. The images are so vibrant and effortless that the people and places leap off of the pages and tell you their story face to face.

I also love the many cultural references to Africa and the African Diaspora. The attire, the languages, the names, the perspectives are all beautiful.

But more importantly, her message in this novel is timely and relevant. We are in a world where marginalized voices can no longer remain in their corners while injustices flood our streets and news channels. We live in a world where hashtags can be conflated with oppression, and that same oppression is force fed to us in media outlets and by political pundits/talking heads. THIS NOVEL rallies against all of it. It is our anger, it is our frustration, it is our fear, it is our shame, and it is our hope. It is our faith.

I can’t wait to reread it (took me 2-3 days the first time). I devoured it the first time, so now I want to savor every syllable. I’m so thankful for the inspiration this novel has given me to finish my own. And I’m even more thankful for this novel (upcoming series!) for giving me the RIGHT to stand in my truths. Our truths.

Because this isn’t about some of us….when you read this book, you will understand that is about ALL of us. As Zélie, Amari, Tzain, Inan, and many others learn in this great fantasy: We are all “Children of Blood and Bone.”

View all my reviews on GoodReads

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